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Monuments for children on a trip to Brussels

Monuments for children on a trip to Brussels



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Brussels is a very nice city to walk around and enjoy. It is the greenest European capital, with the highest proportion of green areas: 28% per inhabitant, which is a huge boost when it comes to traveling with children.

Brussels is also marked by hosting the headquarters of the European Parliament and Commission, as well as that of NATO. A walk through this area is also a highly recommended activity to discover the contrasts of the city.

The great structure of nine steel spheres is the symbol of Brussels. It is impossible to plan a trip to the capital of Belgium and not have a photo taken in front of the Atomium.

Originally intended as a temporary sculpture for the 1958 World's Fair, the structure became permanent and became one of the main tourist attractions in the city.

The Atomium is also a visit that children like a lot because from the areas open to the public you get beautiful views of the city. In addition, the long, colorful escalators and the glass-roofed elevator will delight the little ones.

Schedule: every day from 10:00 a.m. to 6:00 p.m.
Price: € 11 for adults, € 8 for children under 18, € 6 for children under 12 and free for children under 6.

Located next to the Atomium, Mini Europe is an exhibition of 1/25 scale models showing the most famous corners of Europe in miniature. Big Ben, the gondolas of Venice, the Greek Acropolis and up to 350 European monuments come together in a visual and sound spectacle.

Numerous animation games help children to learn more about different destinations in the world: be amazed by the eruption of Vesuvius, break a piece of the Berlin Wall or launch the Ariana rocket while walking around Mini Europe park.

Schedule: from 9:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., except in July and August when the hours are extended until 7:00 p.m.
Price: € 14.20 for adults and € 10.60 for children under 12 years old.

Brussels is the city of comics par excellence. The city where Tintin was born displays numerous murals on the facades of its buildings inspired by the most famous characters in comics.

For this reason, an original way to explore the city is through the fun Comic Strip Route or the mural art circuit: an itinerary through 50 giant frescoes painted on the walls of the Brussels neighborhoods.

Discover Bill and Bolita, Tintin descending a ladder behind Captain Haddock, or Spirou, two steps from Mini-Europe. A fun tour ideal for the little ones.

It is the nerve center of Brussels. Described as “the most beautiful square in the world”, by Victor Hugo, or even as “the most beautiful theater in the world”, by Jean Cocteau, the Grand-Place is the best place to take the pulse of this vibrant city.

In this square are concentrated, in a perimeter of human dimensions, the most interesting old buildings of the Belgian capital.

Declared a UNESCO World Heritage Site, it is full of fashion boutiques, design galleries, curious bookstores, elegant cafes and charming tea rooms.

Next to the Town Hall there is a bronze statue of Everad´t Serclaes. They say it's good luck to touch the statue's arm, so don't leave Brussels without doing it.

This statuette of about 50 centimeters shows a naked boy urinating in a fountain. A funny image that has become one of the most beloved corners of Brussels. Manneken Pis is located next to the Grand Place and is always surrounded by curious tourists.

In 1698 a political personality wanted to make a curious gift to the city and gave a garment to cover the Manneken Pis. The gesture seemed so nice that since then many other presidents of Government who travel to Brussels, come with a suit or garment as a gift. At the Museé de la Ville, about 650 garments are displayed, including a bullfighter outfit and an Elvis Presley outfit. On special occasions, the City Council dresses the original statue with one of these garments.

To the east of the Cinquantenaire Park is the Palace of the same name, one of the most architecturally representative buildings in Brussels.

Its most emblematic part is the triumphal arch or bronze quadriga that is aesthetically reminiscent of the famous Brandenburg Gate in Berlin.

Built to celebrate Belgium's 50th anniversary as an independent nation, this Palace is home to three museums: the Fiftieth Anniversary Museum, the Museum of Military History and Autoworld, a monumental exhibition of vehicles from all ages.

You can read more articles similar to Monuments for children on a trip to Brussels, in the category of Tourist destinations on site.


Video: Famous Landmarks for Kids (August 2022).